We are the world… chalk is my prerogative.

Mom knows my love of globes. My obsession’s exact beginning is a little hazy, but Gadora suspects it started around the time I scored that insanely entertaining Fisher Price illuminated globe in Houston years ago. Now, my love for this earth goes beyond bumps on a globe or lines on a map. On a recent trip to Paris, she sent me a snap of Poops at the Centre Pompidou at the Modern Museum of Art. The exhibition, which I’m not able to find anything else on, was a series of globes on the wall. “The brown blobs on the globes signify the things we do to harm the planet and the pics on the shelves depict all the bad things happening in the world, such as war, famine, etc….” I would have found it mesmerizing too.

Perplexed Poops at the Pompidou.

On a recent trip, I reclined my seat back and grabbed the flight mag from the seat pocket in front of me. I scanned the blah, blah new-steak-restaurant-ads for some place I’d never visit, flipped past the wealthy-people match-making ads, and then spied this… I quietly tore the sheet out of the mag, and folded it into my bag. Gadora would be making this. At some point. Soon.

The Inspiration.

Back in Austin, and not thirty minutes after telling a friend I “NEED” a globe, I scored a National Geographic—1979 model—at the local Goodwill. $4.99. Sweet deal. It wasn’t perfect. It wasn’t totally smooth, but it would do. I loved the base. And because it was slightly damaged, I thought it the perfect guinea pig for my project. Turns out my love of globes is shared almost equally with my desire to paint everything I can with chalkboard paint.

We are the world.

This would turn out to be a really quick project.

The stuff.

Score globe. Check. Procure chalkboard paint. Done (Valspar from Lowes). Use a new brush, taking care to remove any loose bristles. Done. And done. Prepare work space and get to work.

Continue reading “We are the world… chalk is my prerogative.”

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Back to the (chalk)board…

Still reeling from the lovely chalkboard room in 500 Days of Summer, Gadora recalls early on entertaining a teaching profession. I’d line up my stuffed animals, and prepped with my easel chalkboard and a bucket of colors, would get busy teaching them a few things. (These were the days before PowerPoint presentations, so I had a small space in which to make a big impact on my subjects.) It’s little wonder as an adult I’m still quite enamored with all-things-chalk.

Jen Thompson's chalkboard screen door
Jen Thompson's chalkboard screen door

Continue reading “Back to the (chalk)board…”