Xray-ted lampshade

With October lurking around the corner, Gadora spied an opportunity to redress an already fabulous retro Kron® lamp with discarded X-rays: an MRI of one Camille so-and-so and someone else’s pet. Here, lamp before Gadora got a hold of it.

Lamp ~ BEFORE
Lamp ~ BEFORE

Mostly known for TV Lamps popular in the ’50s, this Kron ceramic base is in perfect condition. The gold leaf is intact, and if it’s the original wiring it works too. I’d seen a snappy pendant lamp using the same series of X-rays and asked if I might have a few sheets…

Shade parts and cutting new one
Shade parts and cutting new one

Gadora carefully removed the brittle paper shade as it would be a perfect pattern for the next. Using it as a stencil, I cut along its edges, cutting the X-ray sheets into the appropriate sizes for the new shade.

Cut parts and hole making
Cut parts and hole making

Once all pieces were cut, I sprayed a light coating of white paint on the back of each X-ray sheet. This allows the X-ray shade to really shine once the light in on. At first, I tried cutting the holes for the whip-stitching with The Squeeze’s metal leather hole punch, then—finding the 2×4 too soft a surface—got out the handy power drill. Using the old shade as reference, I place it over the new surface and cut holes an inch apart. Gadora loves her power tools (and short cuts)!

Lamp shade and sinew
Lamp shade and sinew

Cutting the artificial sinew (using real sinew would be downright creepy!) into strips a little longer than the length of each Xray piece, I tied a knot at my starting point and began the arduous—but speedy—task of whip-stitching the shade onto the metal frame.

Stripe

Lamp - AFTER
Lamp - AFTER

The finished product is at once vintage and relevant. In a sunny room, the shade gives a hint at its sinister evening costume.

Kron logo and shade
Kron logo and shade

Left: close-up of Kron® logo fired into original ceramic base, with original well-preserved gold detailing. Right: close-up of X-ray shade. Using the MRI X-rays on the top level of the shade is a nice complement to the bottom and larger X-rays. The other two X-ray sheets towards back of wall, while see-through, are less dramatic than this canine limb.

Lamp - ON
Lamp - ON

The lamp lit up. Because the barrel shade was so large, Gadora knew it would emit enough light from both top and bottom to make a dramatic statement in any room befitting its style.

Stripe

Supplies: X-ray vision and 3-5 X-ray sheets, shade frame (metal), sinew (synthetic), white spray paint, metal hole punch, hammer. And a fired-up power drill as a back up.

Time it takes: 30-40 minutes to cut, spray and drill X-ray sheets. 30 minutes to dry. 45 minutes to weave sinew through holes onto metal frame. Precisely 2 minutes to wipe the smirk off your face for a job well done.

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9 thoughts on “Xray-ted lampshade

  1. im also making an xray lamp but without an existing lamp. if i dont have a lamp shade and i directly put the x ray 3-4 inches away from the bulb will it melt or something?

  2. Hello Valerie,
    Thanks for looking. The “inspiration” pendant lamp I mentioned had the inside of the Xrays sprayed white. I think it is totally a preference thing, but with the 2-tiered shade, serves to “hide” the bulb when not lit.
    Please send me a pic of your finished piece! Good luck.
    Gadora

  3. I have always wanted to make one of these and I am finally starting to get my supplies together to do it. You’re instructions were the first ones I found that told me to paint the back of the x-ray white. Does it really make a difference? I thought it might make it less transparent….does it?

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